What Card Games Did They Play in Ww2?

Photo of author

By Monica Bates

During World War II, soldiers and civilians alike turned to card games as a way to pass the time and alleviate stress. In this article, we’ll explore some of the most popular card games played during this era.

Bridge

One of the most popular card games during World War II was Bridge. This game requires four players who are divided into two teams. The goal is to score points by winning tricks, which are made up of four cards played in turn by each player.

Gin Rummy
Gin Rummy was also a popular choice among soldiers and civilians during the war. This two-player game involves drawing and discarding cards in order to create sets or runs of cards. The goal is to be the first player to reach 100 points.

Poker

Poker has been a beloved card game for centuries, and it was no different during World War II. Soldiers would play this game for hours on end, using anything from matchsticks to cigarettes as currency. There are many variations of poker, but they all involve betting and trying to create the best hand possible.

Canasta
Canasta is a game that was invented in Uruguay in the 1940s, making it a relatively new addition to the world of card games. However, it quickly became popular among Allied soldiers during World War II. Canasta can be played with two to six players and involves creating sets of seven cards called melds.

Hearts

Hearts is a trick-taking game that can be played with three to six players. The goal is to avoid taking any hearts or the queen of spades, which will give you penalty points. The player with the lowest score at the end of the game is declared the winner.

  • Other Popular Games:

– Euchre
– Pinochle
– Cribbage

Conclusion

Card games played an important role during World War II, providing a source of entertainment and camaraderie for soldiers and civilians alike. Whether it was Bridge, Poker, or one of the many other popular games of the time, these card games brought people together during a difficult period in history.